Dyspraxia: Time to work smarter, not just harder

Dyspraxia affects an individual's ability to plan and coordinate motor tasks. It is a developmental disorder, most commonly affecting young males. The condition will manifests itself in every aspect of life, although the severity and age of onset can vary drastically. Continue reading to learn more about the warning signs and symptoms of dyspraxia.

The Ability to Synchronize Motor Movements to a Steady Beat is Linked to a Person’s Ability to Process Speech & Language and Read

A new study by Tierney & Kraus (2013) from Northwestern University’s Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory helps shed more light on why synchronizing motor movements to a steady beat results in faster, more accurate auditory processing, reading, and language processing.  Their landmark study of 124 high school students highlights a neural structure called the inferior colliculus (IC) that serves as a way station for timing information between subcortical auditory structures, cerebral cortex, and the cerebellum. Tierny & Kraus have found the "first evidence linking [motor] beat synchronization ability to individual differences in auditory system function." Continue reading for more information on this groundbreaking research.

We’re going to be at SharpBrains Virtual Summit 2013

2013 SharpBrains Virtual Summit to Discuss Latest on Digital Brain Health, Brain Fitness, Personal Health

150+ science and industry pioneers in 14 countries to gather online on September 19th and 20th

Washington, DC (PRWEB) September 17, 2013

The 2013 SharpBrains Virtual Summit (September 19-20th) will feature over 30 of the world’s top scientists and innovators working on ways to enhance behavioral and brain health via neuroscience-based innovation. All sessions will be chaired by some of the world’s most inspiring and accomplished trailblazers, recognized as Young Global Leaders (YGLs) by the World Economic Forum.

“It is exciting to imagine the possibilities at the intersection of brain health, digital health, and neuroplasticity, but getting there requires addressing the immediate questions confronting us today,” says Alvaro Fernandez, CEO of SharpBrains and Summit’s producer. “We are proud to offer this unique forum to help the field move forward.”

Interactive Metronome for ALS: Improving/Maintaining Function & Quality of Life

 

Larry began to experience symptoms in September of 2007, including fasciculations that became more and more severe, difficulty manipulating his fingers especially when it was cold, and trouble with fine motor skills for tasks such as buttoning his shirt, tying his shoes, or snapping his fingers.  After working as a steel fabricator and crane operator for 35 years, Larry attributed his symptoms to “arthritis.”  However, over the next 2  1/2 years it became gradually more difficult to lift heavy objects, to do intricate work with his fingers such as threading a needle, and it eventually became difficult to write.  By the middle of 2009,   Larry began to notice muscle atrophy in his hands and forearms.  In March 25, 2010, after several EMGs and MRIs, Larry was given the devastating diagnosis of ALS.  

Concentration and the Second Stage of Labor: Outcomes Associated with the Interactive Metronome

 

This is a very interesting study that demonstrates use of the Interactive Metronome (IM) as an evidence-based diagnostic tool.  Interactive Metronome is the only technology that can objectively measure millisecond timing in the brain that has been directly associated with attention, concentration and motor synchronization in published studies too numerous to count.  Researchers from Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology utilized IM as a measure of attention & concentration.  With a sample size of 138 women in the 34th week of gestation who planned to receive an epidural during delivery, this study was conducted over a 1 year period. 

4 Brain Training Therapies for ADHD Children and Adults

These alternative treatments -- electrotherapy stimulation, low-energy neurofeedback, working memory training, and interactive metronome -- can help attention deficit adults and children manage ADHD symptoms without medication.

 

"People with attention deficit have an interesting brain wave profile,” says Richard Brown, M.D., author of How to Use Herbs, Nutrients, and Yoga in Mental Health Care. “Parts of the brain -- areas responsible for planning and sequencing, making decisions, and maintaining focus -- aren’t functioning as they do in other people.”

Therapies aimed at sharpening those faculties are sometimes required. Read on to learn about four brain training techniques that may help ADHD adults and attention deficit children improve focus and memory, and decrease impulsivity, hyperactivity, and other ADHD symptoms.

Reclaiming Your Life With Interactive Metronome

When she was just 15, Meg was involved in a devastating car accident where she sustained a traumatic brain injury. With shortened school days and impaired performance defining her new reality, Meg felt desperate to find a way to reclaim the life she once knew and to help others in her situation, leading her to begin a career as a physical therapy assistant at the very same clinic she completed her rehabilitation.  After just a week of treatment her movements developed fluidity and by the second week her ability to concentrate on the tone dramatically improved. Meg’s sense of balance and physical coordination returned to her by her sixth session. At 21 years old, Meg has done more than simply achieve her goal of regaining the life she thought she lost in her car accident- she’s been able to create a fuller, more satisfying life, one in which she helps others achieve the freedom of thought and movement she feared she lost forever.

Hand-clapping songs improve motor and cognitive skills, research shows.

I receive many interesting scientific articles on the importance of timing in the brain for cognitive, academic, and motor skills...so many it is hard to keep up.  There appears to be keen interest by researchers around the globe re:  the timing mechanisms of the brain and how better or worse timing influences a whole host of abilities in children and adults.  There are many studies exploring the differences between individuals who participate in musical training or synchronized metronome tapping and those that do not, in particular how they differ in academic performance & development.  In this recent study at Ben- Gurion University of the Negev (BGU), researchers concluded that 1st through 3rd grade students who clapped to songs demonstrated fewer developmental learning problems and were better integrated socially than children who did not. 

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