“Brain: an apparatus with which we think we think”

Your brain is an incredibly fast, effective and efficient machine that makes about 10,402,560,000,000,000,000,000 calculations per day if everything is running smoothly. That also leaves a lot of room for error. So how does that three pound fat ball on your shoulders control all of that information? Read more to find out about brain communication and information processing.

Heavy Metal, Rock and Your Health

Nutrition is serious business; in fact, it is a multi-billion dollar business. Everyone is trying to cash in on the health craze with one fad diet after the other. One week it is bad to eat carbohydrates, the next week juice cleanses are all the rage, and before you know it someone is advocating eating like a caveman. With all the competing information out there, what does your body really need? Well, we are no nutrition experts, but here are a few essential minerals to consider in the third part of our brain food series, You Are What You Eat.

Vitamins = Better You

Part two of our brain food series covers the importance of vitamins. A lot of us take a multivitamin, but have you ever stopped to think about what those amazing little organic compounds were doing to your brain and body? Keep reading to find out how to keep the fat in your brain from going bad!

Meet March’s Professional of the Month, Dr. Kevin McGrew

Dr. Kevin McGrew, or the Time Doc, is the Director of the Institute for Applied Psychometrics (IAP). He is also the Research Director for the Woodcock-Muñoz Foundation (WMF) and a Visiting Professor in Educational Psychology at the University of Minnesota. He received a master’s degree in School Psychology at Moorhead State University and a doctoral degree in Educational Psychology at the University of Minnesota. He was a practicing school psychologist for 12 years and then spent 10 years as a Professor of Applied Psychology at St. Cloud State University. Dr. McGrew currently conducts research in the areas of theories of human intelligence, personal competence, intelligence testing, school learning, and the application of neurotechnology to cognitive performance and learning. He has published over 70 different journal articles, books or book chapters in his areas of expertise. Additional information can be found at his MindHub® web portal (www.themindhub.com). Dr. McGrew is a member of the IM scientific advisory board and he explains his theory on brain timing in our new IM demo video. Dr. McGrew also has several other new projects underway, including co-authoring the fourth edition of the Woodcock-Johnson battery (WJ IV), a comprehensive, individually administered battery of cognitive, language and achievement tests. Find out more about the Woodcock Johnson: Fourth Edition, at www.wj-iv.com.

You Are What You Eat

Imagine that your body is a car. First things first, you aren't going anywhere without fuel (calories from food). Secondly, the type of fuel you choose makes a huge difference. You can't put diesel in a Honda Civic, just like someone with celiac disease wouldn't eat gluten. But it goes farther than that. 93 octane burns better than 87. Compounds like NOS will cause massive temporary spikes in power, at a high cost. So, is the higher price worth it? And no, we aren't talking about cars anymore.

Want a good workout? Try not paying attention.

"Restless Mind, Restless Body," a study published in the December edition of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition (Seli et al), shows a correlation between sustained focus and the ability to control secondary motor movement, like sitting still during a lecture.

Who Needs A Watch?

Two clocks!? Holy cow, I'm already late according to the one on the wall. New research suggests that the brain actually has two clocks working simultaneously, and possibly competing with each other. Find out why timing is even more important now than ever.

Chorea? Didn’t we fight a war there once?

Our focus on neuromuscular conditions continues with Huntington's, a truly devastating disease that could be affecting as many as 180,000 people in America. This hereditary disease has been known to stay relatively dormant in some people for 50 years, only to appear after it has been passed on to another generation. Find out how to spot Huntington's.

Dyspraxia: Time to work smarter, not just harder

Dyspraxia affects an individual's ability to plan and coordinate motor tasks. It is a developmental disorder, most commonly affecting young males. The condition will manifests itself in every aspect of life, although the severity and age of onset can vary drastically. Continue reading to learn more about the warning signs and symptoms of dyspraxia.

The Ability to Synchronize Motor Movements to a Steady Beat is Linked to a Person’s Ability to Process Speech & Language and Read

A new study by Tierney & Kraus (2013) from Northwestern University’s Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory helps shed more light on why synchronizing motor movements to a steady beat results in faster, more accurate auditory processing, reading, and language processing.  Their landmark study of 124 high school students highlights a neural structure called the inferior colliculus (IC) that serves as a way station for timing information between subcortical auditory structures, cerebral cortex, and the cerebellum. Tierny & Kraus have found the "first evidence linking [motor] beat synchronization ability to individual differences in auditory system function." Continue reading for more information on this groundbreaking research.

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