Quadriplegic improves quality of life through IM therapy

"Gary" is a 39 year old male with a diagnosis of C4 quadriplegia, onset 12/04 when he was struck in the back. His initial symptoms included mid back pain which quickly progressed to right foot numbness, then loss of sensation to both legs up to the chest level. "Gary" underwent decompression and fusion. At discharge "Gary" was independent with all self-care activities, including showering and dressing, all wheelchair transfers, meal preparation, laundry, dishes, and house cleaning. He gets in and out of his home independently, which requires three steps to enter with bilateral hand rails. Read his amazing story!

 

IM Boosts Therapy Outcomes In Patient with Aphasia

Pat could independently complete Wii Fitness activities, she had increased attention span, improved thought process and concentration, the ability to multi-task, improved reading comprehension and improved balance. Because Pat made significant gains and her functional status improved dramatically she was discharged from therapy.

Come back to Life! IM Helps Bob Recover from Stroke

Bob is now able to use his right arm to feed himself, write his name legibly, make a sandwich, dial the phone and tie his shoes. Bob’s therapist recently ran into him at a high school swim meet. He gestured to her to climb up high in the bleachers to join him where they “caught up” on all of his latest activities!

IM helps Adam regain focus and concentration

 

After completing IM therapy, Adam indicated that he is now better able to concentrate, focus, and understand key points more clearly. Adam also said that he is less impulsive and has more patience. This 28 year old, was admitted to a brain injury program for cognitive rehabilitation at Healthsouth outpatient center. After completing his treatment he went back to work at his finance job. Impressed with the recovery that he made he decided to continue his IM treatment. Read the full story

 

The Brain Clock: My journey to understand the science of mental timing interventions

The Brain Clock: My journey to understand the science of mental timing interventions

Run Gordon Run…this sounds like high-tech snake oil!”   

That was my knee-jerk advice to friend and colleague, Dr. Gordon Taub, when he called me in 2004 to assess my interest in consulting on a “synchronized metronome tapping” (SMT) invention called Interactive Metronome (IM).  IM was supposedly directed at improving the academic achievement of elementary school students.  My skepticism was grounded on the fact that for many years in education (and special education in particular), non-academic interventions focused on remediating underlying cognitive deficits (e.g., psycholinguistic process training; visual-motor or spatial integration training; motor planning retraining) were subsequently found to be ineffective in improving reading, writing and math.  Yes, performance could be improved on tests of the specific cognitive processes trained, but the results did not transfer to academic improvement in the classroom.

By the early to mid-1980’s non-academic cognitive process intervention programs had been debunked as ineffective for improving school achievement.  It was from this skeptical lens that I offered Dr. Taub my advice.  I went as far as telling Dr. Taub that I could not risk my professional reputation by being associated with yet another “magic bullet” claim for school learning, especially for “at risk” learners.  The magic bullet lesson had been burned well into my school psychology psyche after a decade...

Burned Out No More! How IM gave PDD/Autism patient the best school year of her life!

 

Burned Out No More! How IM gave PDD/Autism patient the best school year of her life!

Erin had a diagnosis of PDD/Autism. She was verbal, but unable to have a purposeful conversation. Her voice was very high pitched, and other children turned away from her when she would go up to them and start reciting lines from various Disney movies or Barney episodes on TV. She had been attending traditional OT/PT and Speech therapy visits for 7 out of her 8 years of life and the family was reaching burn out status, as her progress seemed to be very slow.

 

Prior to her discharge, we decided to give one more thing a try. Interactive Metronome. Mom had been reading about progress in attention and focus with children who performed the IM exercises. She wasn’t sure how Erin would do, but since it was summertime and their schedule wasn’t as busy it would be worth the time needed to give IM a try.

 
 

IM is Cool- An ADHD Story

 

Ricky is a 10-year-old boy with a diagnosis of ADHD, aspergers syndrome, anxiety and fine motor delay. Ricky attends public school and is in the 4th grade where he had been struggling with paying attention in class, completing assignments, and focusing on tasks. Ricky’s mother was very fearful that in 4th grade he would get lost in the shuffle and fall behind in his schoolwork. Ricky would never choose to sit and read a book. Getting homework done took hours each night and included a fight from Ricky.

 

Best Practices

IM supports the sharing of Clinical Best Practices among providers. Clinical best practices are methods that consistently produce superior results when compared to other means.  Additionally, “best practices” tend to[...]

Testimonials

Testimonials “The IM has provided a tool for therapists across our company to engage patients in their therapy. With the IM we can push for greater gains in cognition, coordination[...]

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